As someone who takes their photography fairly seriously, I’m always looking for new techniques and projects I can use to better my abilities as a photographer. Some work better than others, naturally, but one I found to really give my phtoography and confidence as a photographer a boost was keeping a photoblog. I used my photoblog as a journal of sorts, documenting my travels and observations, and using photos to tell my stories.


For example, the photos in this post are from a photoblog post I made telling the story of a recent camping trip I made to the Badlands National Park.

big-horn-sheep-walking

Photo by Tiffany Mueller

When I first started photoblogging, I don’t think I realized the impact it would have on my technical skills. Now, looking back, I can attribute a few big breakthroughs to keeping a photoblog…

Investing In Your Ideas

I’m a writer at heart. I love to write things down. I’ve made the habit of writing down my ideas because I found making the effort to put them on paper inspired me to give more thought to them. Suddenly, this small habit of writing something down meant I was following through with more of my ideas. I think this same principle can be applied to our photography. The more time I invested into my ideas by sharing them on a Photoblog, the more I wanted to slow down and make sure I was doing everything right.

This process made me want to improve my skills so I could start sharing better content with my circles, but it also encouraged a personal commitment to invest in my ideas and seek out the necessary skills to create the images I had envisioned taking. In the same way writing my thoughts down on paper inspired me to turn them into tangible ideas, putting my photos in a photoblog inspired me to developing my photography skills.


herd-of-big-horn-sheep-laying-on-hillside

Photo by Tiffany Mueller

Finding A Style

Another key thing I noticed was how I was able to start looking at my collections of images more critically. I began noticing how important it was to maintain a style in the images I took. This helped me fine tune my personal photographic style–an important process for all photographers.


If you are just pulling one or two photos from each session and editing them independently, it’s easy to miss the importance of creating a cohesive collection of photos. When I posted on my photoblog, I would usually post 5-10 photos. I quickly learned how much more appealing it is if all the photos are related and of similar editing style.  In other words, all the photos need to look like they came from the same photographer. Seeing collections of images in the form of a photoblog made this much more apparent and I carried this thought with me in the field when I was shooting and thought about composing shots that were in line with my preferred style and the story I was trying to tell. As a result, I noticed myself developing a stronger eye for the aesthetic I was going for and was able to put a more personal touch on my images.

big-horn-sheep-standing-3rd-wall

Photo by Tiffany Mueller

Build Habits

Essentially, maintaining a photoblog was a way to encourage me to build habits. The experience of taking photos with the intention to share them on a photoblog motivated me to build good habits–like taking photos everyday. Photoblogging taught me to appreciate the challenges of learning photography and enjoy them for the learning experiences they are. Most of all, keeping a photoblog highlighted the importance of staying true to one’s self and finding a personal photographic style.

If you have your own photoblog, be sure to leave a link for us in the comments! I love discovering new blogs to follow.

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